Dyer RJ. 2015  Is there such a thing as landscape genetics?  Molecular Ecology.

Dyer RJ. 2015 Is there such a thing as landscape genetics? Molecular Ecology.

For a scientific discipline to be interdisciplinary it must satisfy two conditions; it must consist of contributions from at least two existing disciplines and it must be able to provide insights, through this interaction, that neither progenitor discipline could address. In this paper, I examine the complete body of peer-reviewed literature self-identified as landscape genetics using the statistical approaches of text mining and natural language processing. The goal here is to quantify the kinds of questions being addressed in landscape genetic studies, the ways in which questions are evaluated mechanistically, and how they are differentiated from the progenitor disciplines of landscape ecology and population genetics. I then circumscribe the main factions within published landscape genetic papers examining the extent to which emergent questions are being addressed and highlighting a deep bifurcation between existing individual- and population-based approaches. I close by providing some suggestions on where theoretical and analytical work is needed if landscape genetics is to serve as a real bridge connecting evolution and ecology sensu lato.

DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.13249

Dyer RJ, Nason JD, Garrick RC. 2010. Landscape modeling of gene flow: improved power using conditional genetic distance derived from the topology of population networks. Molecular Ecology, 19 3746-3759.

Dyer RJ, Nason JD, Garrick RC. 2010. Landscape modeling of gene flow: improved power using conditional genetic distance derived from the topology of population networks. Molecular Ecology, 19 3746-3759.

Landscape genetics is a burgeoning field of interest that focuses on how site-specific factors influence the distribution of genetic variation and the genetic connectivity of individuals and populations. In this manuscript, we focus on two methodological extensions for landscape genetic analyses: the use of conditional genetic distance (cGD) derived from population networks and the utility of extracting potentially confounding effects caused by correlations between phylogeographic history and contemporary ecological factors. Individual-based simulations show that when describing the spatial distribution of genetic variation, cGD consistently outperforms the traditional genetic distance measure of linearized FST under both 1- and 2-dimensional stepping stone models and Cavalli-Sforza and Edward’s chord distance Dc in 1-dimensional landscapes. To show how to identify and extract the effects of phylogeographic history prior to embarking on landscape genetic analyses, we use nuclear genotypic data from the Sonoran desert succulent Euphorbia lomelii (Euphrobiaceae), for which a detailed phylogeographic history has previously been determined. For E. lomelii, removing the effect of phylogeographic history significantly influences our ability to infer both the identity and the relative importance of spatial and bio-climatic variables in subsequent landscape genetic analyses. We close by discussing the utility of cGD in landscape genetic analyses.

DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-294X.2010.04748.x

Garrick RC, Sunnucks P, Dyer RJ. 2010. Nuclear gene phylogeography using PHASE: dealing with unresolved genotypes, lost alleles, and systematic bias in parameter estimation. BMC Evolutionary Biology, 10 118.

Garrick RC, Sunnucks P, Dyer RJ. 2010. Nuclear gene phylogeography using PHASE: dealing with unresolved genotypes, lost alleles, and systematic bias in parameter estimation. BMC Evolutionary Biology, 10 118.

Background: A widely-used approach for screening nuclear DNA markers is to obtain sequence data and use bioinformatic algorithms to estimate which two alleles are present in heterozygous individuals. It is common practice to omit unresolved genotypes from downstream analyses, but the implications of this have not been investigated. We evaluated the haplotype reconstruction method implemented by PHASE in the context of phylogeographic applications. Empirical sequence datasets from five non-coding nuclear loci with gametic phase ascribed by molecular approaches were coupled with simulated datasets to investigate three key issues: (1) haplotype reconstruction error rates and the nature of inference errors, (2) dataset features and genotypic configurations that drive haplotype reconstruction uncertainty, and (3) impacts of omitting unresolved genotypes on levels of observed phylogenetic diversity and the accuracy of downstream phylogeographic analyses.

Results: We found that PHASE usually had very low false-positives (i.e., a low rate of confidently inferring haplotype pairs that were incorrect). The majority of genotypes that could not be resolved with high confidence included an allele occurring only once in a dataset, and genotypic configurations involving two low-frequency alleles were disproportionately represented in the pool of unresolved genotypes. The standard practice of omitting unresolved genotypes from downstream analyses can lead to considerable reductions in overall phylogenetic diversity that is skewed towards the loss of alleles with larger-than-average pairwise sequence divergences, and in turn, this causes systematic bias in estimates of important population genetic parameters.
Conclusions: A combination of experimental and computational approaches for resolving phase of segregating sites in phylogeographic applications is essential. We outline practical approaches to mitigating potential impacts of computational haplotype reconstruction on phylogeographic inferences. With targeted application of laboratory procedures that enable unambiguous phase determination via physical isolation of alleles from diploid PCR products, relatively little investment of time and effort is needed to overcome the observed biases.

DOI: 10.1186/1471-2148-10-118

Dyer RJ. 2007. The evolution of genetic topologies. Theoretical Population Biology, 71 71-79.

Dyer RJ. 2007. The evolution of genetic topologies. Theoretical Population Biology, 71 71-79.

This manuscript explores the simultaneous evolution of population genetic parameters and topological features within a population graph through a series of Monte Carlo simulations. I show that node centrality and graph breadth are significantly correlated to population genetic parameters FST and M (ρ = -0.95; ρ -0.98, respectively), which are commonly used in quantifying among population genetic structure and isolation by distance. Next, the topological consequences of migration patterns are examined by contrasting N-island and stepping stone models of gene movement. Finally, I show how variation in migration rate influences the rate of formation of specific topological features with particular emphasis to the phase transition that occurs when populations begin to become fixed due to restricted movement of genes among populations. I close by discussing the utility of this method for the analysis of intra-specific genetic variation.

DOI: 10.1016/j.tpb.2006.07.001